How to create custom IES files

Everybody uses IES lights in arch viz renderings but most of the time people use templates provided by lighting manufacturers. Besides all if yo are creative and you want to know every little detail of a rendering then tou should definitly check this following tutorial. In this tutorial you will learn How to create custom IES files from Jamie Cardoso.

IES Tutorial By Jamie Cordoso

Top 10 Tips For Designing Models In 3D Printing

Kacie Hultgren scenic designer who uses her 3D printer to build scale models for set designs. Following are Top 10 Tips for designing models in 3D printing.

1. 45 Degree Rule

Recall 45 degree rule, support material will be needed for overhangs that are substantial than 45 degrees or intellectual modelling tricks can be used to get the model to print.

2. Design To Avoid Using Support Material

Support material can leave horrible marks on the outside of your prints, however, support algorithms are improving all the time. Design your models so that they are 3D printable without support, in order to avoid support material which is time consuming.
chairmontage

3. Add Custom Supports

Mouse ears, helper disks and cones designed are into your model to help it print without the use of computer generated supports. Some of the exceptional examples of this design technique are Tony Buser’s “Mouse Eared Rocket Fincan” and Pretty SmallThings “Windsor Chairs”. Rafts can be tough to remove and also mar the bottom of your prints but depending on your software / printer configuration.

4. Know Your Printer’s Limitations

Get information about your model. Are there microscopic towers and small features that are too small to be printed in plastic on a desktop 3D printer? Thread width is an essential variable that the printer can achieve but it is often unnoticed. Thread width is defined by the diameter of your printer’s nozzle. Most printers have a 0.4mm or 0.5mm nozzle. Circle illustrated by a 3D printer is always two thread widths deep: 0.8mm thick with a 0.4mm nozzle to 1mm thick for a 0.5mm nozzle. As Kacie stated in the video, the rule of thumb is “The smallest feature you can create is double the thread width.”

5. Fit Tolerances for Interlocking Parts

Design in your fit tolerance for objects with numerous interlocking parts. Getting correct tolerances can result in different problems. Here are some Kacie’s tips for creating correct tolerances: use a 0.2mm offset for tight fit (press fit parts, connecters) and use a 0.4mm offset for lose fit (hinges, box lids). To define the right tolerance for the thing you are creating, test it yourself with your specific model.

6. Use Shells Properly

Additional shells on characteristics models like small text should not be used as it will make the details vague.

7. Optimize for Thread Width

Plan the walls of your model to be one thread width thick if you are making compliant models or need very thin characteristics. For more samples on utilizing this technique, examine Hultgren’s collection of “Flexible Inspiration” model collection on Thing verse.

8. Orient for the Best Resolution

Adjust your model for the best resolution possible for that particular model as models can be sliced into pieces if required and then reunited. Z resolution can be handled only fused-Filament Fabrication printers. Thread width determines X and Y resolution. Verify the model orientation is capable of printing those features if it has fine characteristics.
okapimontage1


9. Orient for Stress

Verify to orient your model to minimize stress on the part by orienting the model if you want to keep prints from any disruption when force is applied. In order to make sure, the print lines are perpendicular to point of the pressure being applied.To print large models, ABS principle is applied which can be divided along the Z-axis as they cool on the build platform during printing.

10. The “Holy Grail”: Print and Place Designs

“Holy Grail” are multiple combined parts of FFF desktop machines contained in Print in place designs. Guidelines on how to confront “print in place designs”: pull design elements to platform, use bridges for captive parts and gap print carefully are mentioned in Hultgren’s tips.
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GH House Interior Render Postwork by Anninos Konstantinos

Above video is very well suited to a screencast because it is a fairly linear progression or series of steps. However, I don’t think it would work for a ‘making of’ which really needs the artist’s voice and is often best captured with text/images. Anninos made this short screencast of his interior 3d render post processing workflow in Photoshop. No audio on this one – but it is very easy to follow.

Making of 3d Render Winter Interior

Fietter is a 3D visualization artist based in Jakarta, Indonesia. Running a small studio with some partners, doing both fulltime and freelance jobs specializing in 3D architecture stills and animations. In this article he will describe the creation of his 1st place winning ‘Winter Interior’ scene, created for the IDVN Design Visualization Render Challenge 2009. Continue reading “Making of 3d Render Winter Interior”

Making of Minoco Wharf

This co-founder of this render is Lukasz Gradzki from renderare. Renderare studio makes illustrators of unbuilt spaces and architectural designs.

Modeling

 The 3d model of the site was built in AutoCAD (Yes… AutoCAD). After importing the SketchUP massing we used it as a template to build the basic geometry.

All buildings had to be shown during different times of the day and there was no time to illuminate them with real light fixtures, and this is without even considering the increase in render times that it would cause… so we’ve put surfaces set back slightly under the glazing to use them as self illuminating objects later.

They were split into 4 layers to allow some variation… Surfaces for inner glaze skin of the buildings.

All slabs don’t have thickness i.e. they are just flat regions.

Slab edges are represented by polylines. We are going to turn them to renderable splines in 3ds max and assign different material than the off white slabs.

Outer glazing is modeled again just as polylines, also to have renderable splines modifier applied to them. They are divided into five layers as we will be assigning five different patterns.

Just to show the offset distance between inner and outer glass.

Here is the camera viewport with some entourage from 3d libraries was added in 3ds max.

Instead of importing the DWG, it is linked to the scene to allow rapid changes and updates. Here you can see the inner glazing surfaces.

The slabs.

Slab edge as renderable splines.

Internal lights surfaces (inner glazing turned off).

Textures is used to act as the lights inside the buildings in this scene. This is the texture for self luminance of the towers.

Final Images

This is what came out straight from V-Ray.

Replaced the sky in the background.

Reflection of the sky in glazing, ground floor activity and a bit of lens blur in the foreground.

Color balance and contrast corrections.

Final image with cutout people and vignette added.

Making of White Interior with High Ceilings Vray and 3ds Max

This is really nice interior scene with High Ceilings, for creating this image I want to share some of the process. This is amazing scene but with nice mood, you can see the pretty basic for modeling.

Here you can see the position of the sun light and the settings, in each window; the lighting was done using Daylight System and Vray Skylight Portals.

Now let me show you the vray physical camera settings for this render:

Check out some material Setup

Vray displacement used with a concrete bump map, so concrete floor material does not have a bump map. Let’s find out the Vray rendering setup, there is no high render settings in this scene.

And this is how the render looks like straight out of the render without any post production:

A render of Vray volume light to add it in post production, for giving a more dramatic lighting.

Having the Raw Render and the Volume Light Render Pass, added a background image, glow and bloom to the windows, color correction, some chromatic aberration and levels, for having the final render.

And another shot from the scene:

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Breathtaking Architectural Visualization Tutorials

Here we have inspirational pill for our readers. In this post, we revealed the best architectural visualization tutorial. These tutorials are superb and have great composition but all are incredibly breathtaking. Architecture visualization is a very challenging field that requires mastery of a variety of areas. It not only requires some knowledge of civil engineering principles, but also understanding of architecture design, on top of the software requirements. If you like this post, then don’t be hesitate to share your ideas in comment box. Continue reading “Breathtaking Architectural Visualization Tutorials”